PBJ and tequila

It’s the night before market day in the village. Most of the stuff I bought last week is still here, uncooked, some the worse for wear, thanks to the regular hours long blackouts courtesy of gphell. I just haven’t been able. Started the needs assessment today, 2 interviews; 48 more to go and I’m already depressed. There’s no community for lesbian and bisexual women in Guyana. Sure, there is an organization or two and people have friends and acquaintances, some enemies, but there is no big C Community. I’ve known that for several years now but it still depresses the shit out of me. Because I couldn’t change that sad fact. Because I gave up trying to. Because I still need it. The darkness gnaws steadily at my heart and soul and the abyss is always there, growing and snatching at my toes. I will see my ex tomorrow; someone who was once the world to me. Now we barely acknowledge each other’s existence. This has been a year of brokenness; relationships, friendships and the will to fix. Mending one’s self seems to suck all the energy. I aint able cook. PBJ seems doable and appealing. After all, there are 2 or 3 different kinds of jelly to choose from. And tequila. OM

On Activism and Organizing: There is a Distinction

Transformative Spaces

What’s the difference between an organizer, an activist, and someone who is just plain fighting for their life, on a personal level? Often, there is no discernible distinction, as these roles often blend together in ways that could never be separated. But for some people, there is no such complexity. I point this out because, in recent years, there has been a verbal shift in social justice spaces towards referring to everyone involved as an organizer. As a person who believes that we too often negate the meanings of words by transforming them into umbrellaed concepts, I have to say my piece about the matter.

Not everyone who is involved in movement work is an organizer, and that’s okay. And to be real, if you find that you’re spending more time condemning the imperfect ideas and practices of others than you’re spending lifting folx up, you are not healing or building anything — and that’s…

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Help Haitians, not the Disaster Capitalists

Tillah Willah

Disaster time again, for our sisters and brothers in Haiti. Already the vultures circle, using this tragedy as another opportunity to take advantage or worse, to engage in the pornography of suffering black bodies.

Now is not the time for tears, hand-wringing, there are lots of organisations that are quietly doing good work in Haiti that does not line the pockets of multinational aid corporations,  or continue to fatten the Port au Prince elite.

The following is a list I’ve compiled thanks to friends in Haiti and its diaspora.  Please do your own research on the organisations listed below. I’ll keep updating it as more info emerges.

Donations in Trinidad 

A group of citizens are doing a non-organisational collection of items from Monday 10th October. Collection/Drop-off point will be at the Veni Mangé Restaurant 67A Ariapita Ave, Woodbrook.

ITNAC Trinidad based organisation sending volunteers soon to Haiti asking for donations…

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Diary of a mothering worker. October 1, 2016.


Over the past fifteen years, there’s been a trend of cutbacks at universities. Faculty and students are told that governments can’t fund higher education as before. Universities are critiqued as being elitist because they focus on critical thought for its own end, faculty are considered too secure in their jobs so permanent positions are slashed and workloads are increased, and students are pressed into marketable disciplinary areas or seen as wasting taxpayers’ time. Universities that run profits, are re-oriented around industry priorities and needs, and which produce disciplined workers, like a trade school, are considered exemplary.

There are changes that universities should undergo to make them serve student needs better, and create a new generation that can skilfully access a decent standard of living, and be kind and conscientious citizens. But, this is not what neoliberal changes seek.

Rather, they aim to run the university by the operations model of a…

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Nani’s sappodillas

dscn1221this sappodilla tree was planted by my Nani (mother’s mother) about 40 years ago. that makes it about as old as me. Nani died in 1986, ten days after the photo above was taken, but the sappodilla tree she planted remains, still bearing bountifully. the fruit is small small but sweet sweet. it’s one of my favorite fruits; not least of all because i’m also small, brown skinned, and sweet- when i want to be (heh). in fact, my father nicknamed me sappy when i was a child..

today i climbed nani’s tree and picked over a hundred sappodillas; leaving hundreds more still to be harvested.the branches are slender and swayed underfoot. i reached for the sweetness i desired, hoping not to crash to the ground. rain had fallen earlier and the leaves shook droplets into my eyes. the sap gummed up my hair and hands. but there were no followmes nesting, so happily, i got no stings and didn’t have to abort picking and jump down hastily- as on previous memorable occasions.

some people- men mostly- say that women shouldn’t climb trees; that the trees will stop bearing. this is sheer stupidness and you can go ahead and tell dem people i seh so- even (and maybe especially) if they are your family members/loved ones. a laaang suck teeth in these circumstances is also warranted.

there is an art to picking sappodillas. ideally, you’re supposed to wait until the little spike on the base falls off, then harvest. but the high winds and breeze had been blowing plenty off the tree and the birds, bats, and other critters have been feasting- as the skins and remnants on the ground attest to. so, to ensure that we humans got our share, i decided to climb and pick some to ‘set’ a couple days in a closed, newspaper-lined container.

it’s tricky tho- fruit that, from the ground look large, shrink when viewed up close. i have to make a calculation between taking a chance and leaving them on the tree to get a little more size, but possibly losing them to the birds etc, or playing it safe and picking them smaller. it’s a tough decision- small and sure vs bigger but possibly bird bitten.. the greedy gambler must come to terms with the fact that no matter how much something is loved and wanted, one creature simply cannot consume all. so i pick some and leave some for the birds, bats, and other critters.🙂 pachamama provides for us all, sharing is caring, and harmonious living is possible.

i wash and parcel and then spend long minutes cleaning my skin of the sap. half dozen of the already ripe ones satisfy my soul. when i was younger and more foolish, i used to use a knife to cut the fruit and a spoon to scoop and eat. now that i’m older and wiser, i use my thumb to split the soft brown skin and just suck. sometimes i even eat the skin.

tomorrow, i will transplant the seedling that’s growing in front of the old pit latrine. i won’t have any descendants but hopefully the trees i plant today will feed some creature(s) some day.

thank you, nani. #sweetmemories



Critical thought versus the capitalist hydra

dorset chiapas solidarity


Critical thought versus the capitalist hydra

portada-libro-II-p.jpg-nggid0512415-ngg0dyn-350x350-00f0w010c010r110f110r010t010By: Gilberto López y Rivas/ II

The second book of Critical thought versus the capitalist hydra includes the positions and interventions –among individuals and collectives– of 35 invitees to the seminar which was held under that name in San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas, from April 29 to May 9, 2015. The compiled texts, which range from greetings, interventions or words to formal positions, touch an extensive variety of themes that, in their majority, try to respond to the call of the Zapatistas around the exercise of critical thought, not idle or routine, much less conformist, which contributes to emancipatory and anti-capitalist struggles, facing that monster with multiple heads: the hydra, which has led humanity, and the planet itself, to the brink of possible destruction.

Different from the first volume, in which are included all the participations of EZLN members, and which is characterized…

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Statistics and names of ethnic cleansing during the PPP’s reign – By Freddie Kissoon

read. re-blog. remember. act.

Guyanese Online

Statistics and names of ethnic cleansing during the PPP’s reign 


The talk coming out of the mouth of the Indian dominated PPP and its affiliate organizations, particularly the Indian Arrival Committee, now the Indian Action Committee, is that there is ethnic cleansing against East Indians by the APNU-AFC Government. The IAC has latched on to certain dismissals in the public sector.

This same IAC was on another planet when African Guyanese were supplanted in the same public sector and in scholarship awards. 

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The Ploy of Soy

Nourishing Our Children


Although widely promoted as a health food, hundreds of studies link modern processed soy to malnutrition, digestive problems, thyroid dysfunction, cognitive decline, reproductive disorders, immune system breakdown, and even heart disease and cancer. How could soy be linked to all this disease? Because the soybean contains many naturally occurring toxins. All legumes contain toxins but the problem with soy is that the toxins are found in very high levels and are resistant to the traditional ways of getting rid of them.

Long, slow fermentation, as in the traditional production of miso, tempeh and soy sauce, gets rid of the phytic acid and other digestive inhibitors but not the phytoestrogens in soy.

Myths About Isoflavones

One of the most common myths is that soy estrogens (isoflavones) are beneficial for your health. Isoflavones are the estrogen-like compounds occurring naturally in soy foods. They act as the plant’s natural pesticides, causing insects to…

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hugelkultur in lusignan

< The Many Benefits of Hugelkultur Inspiration Green and Permaculture magazine Thursday, 17th October 2013

Hugelkultur are no-dig raised beds with a difference. They hold moisture, build fertility, maximise surface volume and are great spaces for growing fruit, vegetables and herbs. Hugelkultur, pronounced Hoo-gul-culture, means hill culture or hill mound. Instead of putting branches, leaves and grass clippings in bags by the curbside for the bin men… build a hugel bed. Simply mound logs, branches, leaves, grass clippings, straw, cardboard, petroleum-free newspaper, manure, compost or whatever other biomass you have available, top with soil and plant your veggies.>


hugelkultur- the beginning

hugelkultur- the beginning2

hugelkulture bed4

Diary of a mothering worker. August 11, 2016

common scenario in Guyana as well.. IPV is a problem regionally/worldwide, unfortunately


Post 233.

Though she sat with her head down, I could only think of her resilience. Now 31 years old, having survived fourteen years of battering by the father of her seven children, she seemed finally about to make a sure step away. Her neighbours, who have offered many moments of care, are unsung heroes of our nation, helping without public recognition, and it’s their strength that she is relying on to find hers.

The beatings started after her first son, as they do for so many women for whom having children puts them at greater risk of domestic violence. At first, women think it will stop. She said, she had ‘hope’. As their children increase, they become less able to leave, and to manage on their own. The rest of us may think that anything is better than a violent home, but that doesn’t help us to understand the…

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